7.11.13

Haiku: Watch A Blade Of Grass...

"The moment one gives close attention to anything, even a blade of grass, it becomes a mysterious, awesome, indescribably magnificent world in itself." Henry Miller 

Haiku: Watch A Blade of Grass -  Above is a blade of flowering Zoysia Grass

Watch a blade of grass
Dancing gaily in the wind
Teeming, green with life

Cut a blade of grass
Leaking all its life, turns brown
One perspective? Death

Nurture all our grass
Planting, feeding, in season
What we sow, love grows

 This week, the prompt is: Grass


What is a haiku?
 As Leo of Haiku Heights aptly explains, a haiku is a three line poem. It shows what the author wants us to understand from it, rather than tell it directly. The limitation to a haiku is seventeen syllables. It can be at maximum, that much. If you wish to go by the traditional Japanese structure even with English haiku, you can use a 5-7-5 syllable, or 3-5-3 syllable structure





In addition to the weekly Haiku Heights piece above, I have joined the haiku poets of Carpe Diem to work on writing Ten Renga.  According to Kristjaan of Carpe Diem, "a Tan Renga is a short-linked poem which has two stanza, the first stanza has 5-7-5 syllables (the haiku assigned) and the second stanza has 7-7 syllables (I write it). The second stanza is a response on the first and has to have a 'kind of link' with the first stanza, but it can also be completely different say 'a kind of reaction or answer' on the first, but there always has to be, in some way, a 'link' with the first stanza." 
See more on this form of haiku below.  




"To us also, through every star, through every blade of grass, is not God made visible if we will open our minds and our eyes." Thomas Carlyle 

Haiku: Watch A Blade of Grass - Above is a Bay Willow Leaf

 Tan Renga Haiku

even candent days
cannot drive the willow leaves
from their homing place  (by Magical Mystical Teacher)

As autumn shades summer days
Willow, like grass, fades away (by Me)


 shedding summer skin
willow floats downstream
reflecting season's end  (by Maggie Grace)

Lingering blades of grass know…
What we sow with love, will grow (by Me)

 
  Today, the words are:  Tan Renga:, MMT's ''even candent days'', and Maggie's ''shedding summer skin''

What is Carpe DiemBlog Owner, Kristjaan Panneman,  describes it as:  "a weblog on haiku. It's a new daily haiku meme where you can write a classical or non-classical haiku on a given prompt. Haiku is an ancient Japanese poetry form. A haiku has three short lines and describes a short moment (as short as the sound of a pebble thrown into water). Mostly a haiku counts 5-7-5 syllables and is sometimes called 'counted verse."





The idea in the haiku above is to write the second stanza of an assigned incomplete Tan Renga, by making an association with the theme of the first stanza. For this exercise, I have copied and pasted two assigned first stanzas from Maggie Grace and Magical Mystical Teacher. I have included my second stanzas below theirs to complete the idea. Does this clarify what a Tan Renga means/does in a haiku? If unclear, please ask questions and I'll clarify. What are your thoughts on the subject? What do you see in nature that reminds you to nurture?

Haiku: Watch a blade of Grass - Above is moving lawncare grass in GIF

Some Food for Thought: How do you view the concept of nature and nurture in your life? Take a moment to contemplate what the words Grass and the message of the Tan Renga mean to you?   Love and Peace in 2013.

I would love to hear from you: Please leave me a comment. Thank You!

PHOTO CREDITS/ATTRIBUTIONS:

Ten Renga Haiku by Magical Mystical Teacher(MMT) on Willow
More Carpe Diem Tan Renga: "even candent days."
Final two lines © 2013 by Me - E. Obih-Frank

Ten Renga Haiku by Maggie Grace of “Falling into Me
More Carpe Diem Tan Renga: “Shedding Summer Skin”
Final two lines © 2013 by Me - E. Obih-Frank

All Photographs: Grass, Zoysia GrassWillow LeafWeeping Willow, and/or Lawncare Grass, via Wikipedia, or from my personal collection.


 Until Next Time…
Ask. Believe. Receive. ©
Elizabeth Obih-Frank
Mirth and Motivation
Positive Kismet


60 comments:

  1. What do you observe in nature that reminds you of the importance of nurture? Watching blades of grass moving freely on the side of the highway triggered this haiku... :-)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love your third haiku, Ms. Eliz. Reminds me of the proverb, "we reap what we sow." Thanks for the reminder!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Even how fragile the grass blades are, they can cut into skin.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Blade of grass moving
    freely in the wind
    I wish to be free.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I love watching the trees sway while the wind blows. It reminds me that life is beautiful no matter how hard it is.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Marie Angeli, TY! That line spoke to me deeply too. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  7. So true Kat... The tiniest of actions can develop or destroy us/all around us. TY!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Janz, that is beautifully written. You really should try your hand at haiku. You can do it! :-) TY!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Mayette, I agree with our observation. There is something soothing, even mesmerizing about the gentle sway of plants and tree branches; to me, it says life is precarious, we must cherish it. TY!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Beautifully pictured haiku. Serene and lovely.
    The growth of love in the form of grass is exemplary. :-)
    -HA

    ReplyDelete
  11. your haiku is written very compassionate, writes a nature lover

    ReplyDelete
  12. That death of grass went so well with the death of willow....

    ReplyDelete
  13. I love this part, Ms. Eliz! --- Lingering blades of grass know…
    What we sow with love, will grow (by Me)

    And yes, watching that gif image of the grass is so soothing and calming.

    ReplyDelete
  14. "what we sow in love will grow..." very good completion Elizabeth. it is nice to read your inspirational words once again. thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  15. There's something about watching nature that makes one introspective and profound.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Very inspiring. I love the first poem. The meaning is so deep when you look at it.

    ReplyDelete
  17. It's nice to see this photo of grass specially as the country just survived a super typhoon. Like the blades of grass who bend with the wind only to whip back and stand up again, the Filipino spirit is also resilient.

    ReplyDelete
  18. beautifully written - thank you. ♥

    ReplyDelete
  19. Wonderfully composed Tan Renga and a lovely post by the way. It's a joy to visit your weblog.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Interesting haiku about grass. it has been a while since I last wrote a haiku.

    ReplyDelete
  21. reminds me of the saying that beauty is in the details... what may seem trivial is actually a marvel if we only pay close attention to it.

    ReplyDelete
  22. a very inspiring thought indeed. gotta love how haikus bring out the poetic side of someone.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I just love it! And a blade of grass is something that we don't pay much attention. That makes this haiku powerful! :)

    ReplyDelete
  24. Another great haikus. There's always beauty in tiny little things and that always amazed me. Have great day,:)

    ReplyDelete
  25. Even the simpliest things can tell and teach us a lot.

    ReplyDelete
  26. another great piece, Eliz! sometimes we do miss the beauty when we become too busy

    ReplyDelete
  27. I just reread this with a different perspective. Could it be possible that we created Haiyan? I'm not buying into the conspiracy theories of it being a man-made storm, but somehow, maybe we're all responsible for the supertyphoon.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Wonderful haiku and photo there. :)

    ReplyDelete
  29. Haikus are quite deep... but if we look deeper, so inspiring!

    ReplyDelete
  30. i love the gif photo of the grass!
    just like our lives, we need to constantly "feed" it with love and everything essential to a meaningful life.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Love the photo. even it was just a grass, still, they will look lovely when captured by lens.
    Another nice haiku from you.
    By the way, we are okay after haiyan. We are far from the center of the typhoon but still feel sad after seeing the devastation happened.

    ReplyDelete
  32. When I think of grass, I think of freshness and life.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Interesting and inspiring post. Love how you write your haiku

    ReplyDelete
  34. I'm here again Eliz.. I wish I can make great haikus like you do.. hehe

    ReplyDelete
  35. TY HA! Your feedback is precious to me.

    ReplyDelete
  36. I'm a lover of nature so I appreciate your observation Geli!

    ReplyDelete
  37. Indeed Bjorn! They worked well for sure. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  38. TY Van! I was glad to find the GIF... it is relaxing. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  39. TY for the feedback Sun! I will be following up to return the comment love.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Yes, Aileen, nature gives us plenty to contemplate...

    ReplyDelete
  41. TY Jhari and it came to me like a prayer... in a dream.

    ReplyDelete
  42. TY Vera! The people of the Philippines have great spirit and will recover and overcome the typhoon tragedy.

    ReplyDelete
  43. TY again for the kind words Sun!

    ReplyDelete
  44. TY Kristjaan! I love the Tan Renga and have learned so much from your haiku posts. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  45. Linnor, you speak great wisdom... So true!

    ReplyDelete
  46. TY Rose and I'm not much of a poet... I try. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  47. TY Meikah, I agree. We spend less time looking at grass, yet all of nature offers insights. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  48. Well said Melgie! If we look, we will learn. TY! ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  49. Dominique, you should try your hand at it again... I'm a bit rusty but will keep it up. TY!

    ReplyDelete
  50. True Glenda! I learn something new every day... ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  51. Marie B! I concur, so much to learn in every moment.

    ReplyDelete
  52. Marie Angeli, Interesting observation and my response is, honestly, I don't know. Scientists are divided on the impact of global warming and environmental change. We contribute our part for sure, but I doubt that we are liable for creating typhoons. TY!

    ReplyDelete
  53. TY Pinay! I find it quite meditative too... each one is a challenge for me to write as I'm tempted to go for poetic rhyming... I try my best though. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  54. TY Farida! We must feed our lives good messages and food. True! ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  55. TY Allan and I'm glad to hear that you are oak.. Since many on my blogroll are from the Philippines, I was naturally worried for everyone of you and your families... My heart goes out to all who lost family and friends... Hugs to all!

    ReplyDelete
  56. JanzC, Try your hand at haiku. Go for it! TY! :-)

    ReplyDelete
  57. Thanks again for the double comment love, Aileen, Dominique and all! Much appreciated. ;-)

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking a moment to comment ... It is appreciated!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...